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1st July- 8th July 2018  
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LECTURES & SEMINARS

Each morning two lectures take place in Newman House. Each afternoon several series of seminars are held in Newman House and Boston College. All lectures and a choice of seminar are included in student enrollment. Members of the public may attend the morning lectures by purchasing a day-pass for 20 Euro. Seminars are reserved for enrolled students only. See the daily Academic Schedule for details.

 

LECTURERS

ELIZABETH M. BONAPFEL is a German Research Foundation (DFG) Research Associate at the Peter Szondi Institute for Comparative Literature, Freie Universität Berlin. Her current book project traces the evolution of punctuation in modern English literature. She received her Ph.D. in English and American Literature from New York University with a certificate in Poetics and Theory in 2014 and a postgraduate certificate in the History of the Book from the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Studies, University of London in 2017. She was a Volkswagen Foundation and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Dahlem Humanities Center, Freie Universität Berlin (2014-2015) and a doctoral fellow of the German Research Foundation (DFG) graduate research colloquium Lebensformen und Lebenswissen (Life Forms and the Know How of Living) at the Europa-Universität Viadrina (2011-2014). She is co-editor of Doubtful Points: Joyce and Punctuation (2014), in which her article “Marking Realism in Dubliners” appears. Other work has appeared or will appear in Theatre Survey, the Dublin James Joyce Journal, the James Joyce Quarterly, and Joyce Studies in Italy. She received her BA in English Literature from Haverford College.

MICHAEL G. CRONIN is a Lecturer in English at Maynooth University, where he directs the MA in Literatures of Engagement. He is the author of Impure Thoughts: Sexuality, Catholicism and Literature in Twentieth-Century Ireland (MUP, 2012), along with essays on twentieth-century and contemporary Irish fiction and on gender/sexuality politics in Irish culture. He is currently working on a project provisionally entitled “Revolutionary Bodies: Homoeroticism and the Political Imagination in Irish Writing”.

LUCA CRISPI is a Lecturer in the UCD James Joyce Research Centre in the School of English, Drama and Film at University College Dublin. He is co-editor (with Sam Slote) of How Joyce Wrote “Finnegans Wake” (University of Wisconsin, 2007) and author of Joyce’s Creative Process and the Construction of Characters in “Ulysses”: Becoming the Blooms (OUP 2015). He is founder and co-editor with Anne Fogarty of the Dublin James Joyce Journal (2008-present). He was the James Joyce and W.B. Yeats Research Scholar at the National Library of Ireland, 2003-7, and co-curator of the exhibitions ‘James Joyce and Ulysses’ and “The Life and Works of W.B. Yeats” and was the James Joyce Scholar-in-Residence, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, from 1996 to 2003. His recent articles have appeared in Variants: The Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship, James Joyce Quarterly, Genetic Joyce Studies, and European Joyce Studies. He is currently working on a monograph entitled The Genesis of “Ulysses”, and is editing with Alexis and Maria Anna Léon a volume titled James Joyce and Paul L. Léon: The Story of a Friendship Revisited.

ANNE FOGARTY is Professor of James Joyce Studies at University College Dublin. She is founder and co-editor with Luca Crispi of the Dublin James Joyce Journal and was editor of the Irish University Review, 2002-2009.  She was Associate Director of the Yeats International Summer School 1995-1997 and has been Academic Director of the Dublin James Joyce Summer School since 1997.   She was President of the International James Joyce Foundation from 2008-2012 and has co-organized three international James Joyce symposia, one in London (in 2000) and two in Dublin (in 2004 and 2012). She has written about many aspects of Joyce’s work (especially historicist dimensions of Dubliners and Ulysses) and is co-editor with Timothy Martin of Joyce on the Threshold (2005), with Morris Beja of Bloomsday 100: Essays on “Ulysses”( 2009), and with Fran O’Rourke of Voices on Joyce (2015).   Her study of the historical and political dimensions of Ulysses is forthcoming, entitled James Joyce and the Politics of Commemoration: Reading History in “Ulysses”.  She has published widely on aspects of contemporary Irish writing and written essays on Eavan Boland, Colum McCann, Colm Tóibín, Mary Lavin, Roddy Doyle, Eimear McBride, and Éilís Ní Dhuibhne and co-edited in 2013 a collection of essays, Imagination in the Classroom, the first study of the teaching of creative writing in Ireland.  She has recently co-edited the first collection of essays on the Northern Irish novelist Deirdre Madden, Deirdre Madden: New Critical Perspectives, which is forthcoming from Manchester University Press. 

TERENCE KILLEEN is Research Scholar at the James Joyce Centre, Dublin. He has written on Joyce in the James Joyce Quarterly, the James Joyce Literary Supplement and the Joyce Studies Annual. He is a frequent contributor to the online resource, jjon.org. His recent publications include an essay on the photographs of Joyce's Dublin by the Modernist photographer Lee Miller taken in 1946, which appeared in Voices on Joyce (UCD Press, 2015). An essay on the editing of Finnegans Wake has appeared in the online journal Genetic Joyce Studies and another essay, "From Notes to Text: The Role of the Notebooks in the Composition of Finnegans Wake", has appeared in Dublin James Joyce Journal 8 (2015). "A Starchamber Quiry: Finnegans Wake and the Law" was published in Joyce and the Law, ed. Jonathan Goldman (University of Florida Press, 2017) and "A Portrait Without Perspective" appeared in the 2018 Palgrave Macmillan collection, Outside His Jurisfiction, edited by Katherine Ebury and James Fraser.  He is the author of “Ulysses” Unbound: A Reader's Companion to “Ulysses", a new edition of which was published by University of Florida Press in 2018. He has recently been elected to serve a second term as a trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation, is a member of the board of the  SHAPE  \* MERGEFORMAT James Joyce Centre, and is a former journalist with The Irish Times, for which he still writes.

ONNO KOSTERS is an Assistant Professor of English literature and translation at Utrecht University.  His teaching and research fields are English and Anglo-Irish literature 1700-present, and (literary) translation. He wrote his doctoral dissertation on James Joyce (Ending in Progress: Final Sections in James Joyce’s Prose Fictions, 1999), and has published translations of and studies on Joyce, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, E.E. Cummings, Weldon Kees, Seamus Heaney, Derek Walcott, and many others.He has Kosters edited and published in volume 14.1 (2015) of Hypermedia Joyce Studies, dedicated to Joyce's poetry. He is an advisor of the new scholarly edition of Finnegans Wake, to be published by OUP in 2019, and a member of the editorial boards of European Joyce Studies and Samuel Beckett Today/Aujourd'hui.  Kosters was the Director of “a long the krommerun: XXIV International James Joyce Symposium, Utrecht, June 2014” (http://jjs2014.wp.hum.uu.nl/).The selected papers of the Symposium were published in 2016 (Brill Publications, no. 24 in the European Joyce Studies series). He is currently working on a monograph on Joyce, to be published 2 February 2022. To date, Kosters has published four collections of poetry; selections from his creative work were translated into English, German and French (for more information, see www.doelverdediger.nl). In 2013 he was awarded the annual Turing Poetry Award. Kosters’ translation into Dutch of Beckett’s novel Watt was published in 2006 and awarded the annual Filter Translation Award. His translation (with Han van der Vegt) of Heaney’s penultimate collection District and Circle was published in 2013 (Meulenhoff publishers); Kosters’ and Van der Vegt’s translation of Adam Foulds’s The Broken Word was published in 2014.

PETER KUCH is the inaugural Eamon Cleary Professor of Irish Studies, University of Otago, New Zealand. He holds an Honours degree from the University of Wales and an M.Litt and D.Phil from Oxford, where he studied with Richard Ellmann and John Kelly. He has held posts at the University of Newcastle, Australia; Université de Caen, France; and the University of New South Wales, Australia; and been a Visiting Fellow at the Humanities Research Centre at the Australian National University; at Trinity College, Dublin; and the Keogh Naughton Institute at Notre Dame (USA). He has published more than 60 refereed articles, book chapters and books on Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, Irish theatre, Irish literature, Irish and Australian film, literary theory, Australian literature, and Irish/Australian history and presented conference papers and given lectures in over 30 countries. He is a commissioning editor for the Irish Studies Review (Routledge) and is on the Editorial Board of several journals. His most recent book is Irish Divorce/Joyce's Ulysses (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

AKRAM PEDRAMNIA is an Iranian-Canadian writer and translator. She has studied both English Literature and Medicine at the University of Tehran and McMaster University. She is the current translator of James Joyce’s Ulysses in the Persian language, for which the first volume will be released in the Spring of 2018. She is also the translator of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night (2009) and Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita (2013), which was disseminated through the Iranian black market. Her works challenge a system of imposed censorship of literature. She has also translated works by various authors such as Colm Tóibín, E. L. Doctorow, Joan London, Noam Chomsky, Richard B. Wright, Naomi Klein, among others. She has also authored 4 novels in the Persian language on themes which reveal underlying social issues in Iran.

ANTHONY ROCHE is Professor Emeritus in the School of English, Drama and Film, University College Dublin. His publications include Contemporary Irish Drama (Gill and Macmillan, 1994; second expanded edition Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), Brian Friel: Theatre and Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), Synge and the Making of Modern Irish Drama (Carysfort Press, 2013) and The Irish Dramatic Revival 1899-1939 (Methuen, 2015). He is editor of The Cambridge Companion to Brian Friel (Cambridge University Press, 2006). He is Chair of the Management Board of the Irish University Review.

FRITZ SENN is founder and Director of the Zürich James Joyce Foundation and Patron of the Dublin James Joyce Summer School.  He has played a key role in shaping Joyce Studies and has written widely on all aspects of Joyce's work, especially on Joyce and translation and on Joyce's use of Classical literature. His publications include, Joyce's Dislocutions, edited by John Paul Riquelme (1984), Inductive Scrutinies: Focus on Joyce, edited by Christine O'Neill (Lilliput, 1995). A volume of interviews tracing his recollections of the global Joyce community, The Joycean Murmoirs, was published in 2007, edited by Christine O'Neill.  Noch mehr über Joyce: Streiflichter, a collection of essays, appeared in 2012.

 

SEMINAR LEADERS

DUBLINERS

SCOTT ERIC HAMILTON completed his PhD at University College Dublin in 2013 and is currently an instructor and lecturer of academic writing and literature at UCD. Dr. Hamilton has published essays in various journals on the works of Samuel Beckett and is co-editor of the 2017 volume Samuel Beckett and the ‘State’ of Ireland. One of his current research projects, Beckett’s Excavatory Aesthetic, focuses on archaeology, landscape, and time in Beckett’s work.  The second research project, currently entitled The Beckett Directory, aims to chronicle all of the proper names in Beckett’s canon. He is also guest editor for an upcoming special issue of The Parish Review: Journal of the International Flann O’Brien Society focusing on issues of identity and authorship in the work of Flann O’Brien. Dr. Hamilton was a researcher for the development of the 2014  “James Joyce’s ‘The Dead’” IPad application.

A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN

CHRISTINE O’NEILL studied English and German at the University of Zurich and Trinity College Dublin. Her publications include Too Fine a Point: A Stylistic Analysis of the “Eumaeus” Episode in James Joyce's “Ulysses” (1996), Inductive Scrutinies: Focus on Joyce, a collection of essays by Fritz Senn (1995), The Joycean Murmoirs of Fritz Senn (2007) and Niall Montgomery: Dublinman (2015). She has contributed to various recent international Joyce publications and has worked as a researcher, editor, translator and arts administrator in recent years.

ULYSSES

FRITZ SENN is founder and Director of the Zürich James Joyce Foundation and Patron of the Dublin James Joyce Summer School.  He has played a key role in shaping Joyce Studies and has written widely on all aspects of Joyce's work, especially on Joyce and translation and on Joyce's use of Classical literature. His publications include, Joyce's Dislocutions, edited by John Paul Riquelme (1984), Inductive Scrutinies: Focus on Joyce, edited by Christine O'Neill (Lilliput, 1995). A volume of interviews tracing his recollections of the global Joyce community, The Joycean Murmoirs, was published in 2007, edited by Christine O'Neill.  Noch mehr über Joyce: Streiflichter, a collection of essays, appeared in 2012.

FINNEGANS WAKE

TERENCE KILLEEN is Research Scholar at the James Joyce Centre, Dublin. He has written on Joyce in the James Joyce Quarterly, the James Joyce Literary Supplement and the Joyce Studies Annual. He is a frequent contributor to the online resource, jjon.org. His recent publications include an essay on the photographs of Joyce's Dublin by the Modernist photographer Lee Miller taken in 1946, which appeared in Voices on Joyce (UCD Press, 2015).  An essay on the editing of Finnegans Wake has appeared in the online journal Genetic Joyce Studies and another essay, "From Notes to Text: The Role of the Notebooks in the Composition of Finnegans Wake", has appeared in Dublin James Joyce Journal 8 (2015). "A Starchamber Quiry: Finnegans Wake and the Law" was published in Joyce and the Law, ed. Jonathan Goldman (University of Florida Press, 2017) and "A Portrait Without Perspective" appeared in the 2018 Palgrave Macmillan collection, Outside His Jurisfiction, edited by Katherine Ebury and James Fraser.  He is the author of “Ulysses” Unbound: A Reader's Companion to “Ulysses", a new edition of which was published by University of Florida Press in 2018. He has recently been elected to serve a second term as a trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation, is a member of the board of the  SHAPE  \* MERGEFORMAT James Joyce Centre, and is a former journalist with The Irish Times, for which he still writes.

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The Dublin James Joyce Summer School and University College Dublin are pleased to present the 2018 programme in collaboration with the National Library of Ireland and the James Joyce Centre, Dublin.

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