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30th June - 7th July 2019
 
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LECTURES & SEMINARS

Each morning two lectures take place in Newman House. Each afternoon several series of seminars are held in Newman House and Boston College. All lectures and a choice of seminar are included in student enrollment. Members of the public may attend the morning lectures by purchasing a day-pass for 20 Euro. Seminars are reserved for enrolled students only. See the daily Academic Schedule for details.

 

LECTURERS

SOPHIE CORSER teaches comparative literature at Goldsmiths, University of London, where she also completed her PhD in 2018 with a thesis titled ‘Against Joyce: Ulysses, Authorship, and the Authority of the Reader’. Her article on narrative in Marcel Proust’s Swann in Love and E. M. Forster’s A Room with a View was included in the edited volume Narrating the Passions: New Perspectives from Modern and Contemporary Literature (Peter Lang, 2017), and she has published or forthcoming articles and review work on Joyce, the novelist Barbara Trapido, and rewritings of Ovid by Denise Riley and Ted Hughes. From 2014-16 she co-edited the Modern Humanities Research Association’s postgraduate and early career journal, Working Papers in the Humanities. As of 2018, Sophie is the contributor responsible for the James Joyce section of The Year’s Work in English Studies, the qualitative narrative bibliographical review of scholarly work on literatures written in English.

LUCA CRISPI is a Lecturer in the UCD James Joyce Research Centre in the School of English, Drama, Film and Creative Writing at University College Dublin. He is co-editor (with Sam Slote) of How Joyce Wrote “Finnegans Wake” (University of Wisconsin, 2007) and author of Joyce’s Creative Process and the Construction of Characters in “Ulysses”: Becoming the Blooms (Oxford University Press, 2015). He is founder and co-editor with Anne Fogarty of the Dublin James Joyce Journal (2008-present). He was the James Joyce and W.B. Yeats Research Scholar at the National Library of Ireland, 2003-7, and co-curator of the exhibitions ‘James Joyce and Ulysses’ and “The Life and Works of W.B. Yeats” and was the James Joyce Scholar-in-Residence, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, from 1996 to 2003. His recent articles have appeared in Variants: The Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship, James Joyce Quarterly, Genetic Joyce Studies, and European Joyce Studies. He is currently working on a monograph entitled The Genesis of “Ulysses”, and is editing with Alexis and Maria Anna Léon a volume titled James Joyce and Paul L. Léon: The Story of a Friendship Revisited.

JAMES FAIRHALL teaches modern  literature and environmental studies at DePaul University in Chicago.  He has published James Joyce and the Question of History and, recently, a series of ecocritical essays on Joyce’s writing.  An award-winning creative writer, he is completing a story cycle called Perfume River.

ANNE FOGARTY is Professor of James Joyce Studies at University College Dublin. She is founder and co-editor with Luca Crispi of the Dublin James Joyce Journal and was editor of the Irish University Review, 2002-2009.  She was Associate Director of the Yeats International Summer School 1995-1997 and has been Academic Director of the Dublin James Joyce Summer School since 1997.   She was President of the International James Joyce Foundation from 2008-2012 and has co-organized three international James Joyce symposia, one in London (in 2000) and two in Dublin (in 2004 and 2012). She has written about many aspects of Joyce’s work (especially historicist dimensions of Dubliners and Ulysses) and is co-editor with Timothy Martin of Joyce on the Threshold (2005), with Morris Beja of Bloomsday 100: Essays on “Ulysses”( 2009), and with Fran O’Rourke of Voices on Joyce (2015).   She is completing a study of the historical and political dimensions of Ulysses, James Joyce and the Politics of Commemoration: Reading History in “Ulysses”.  She has published widely on aspects of contemporary Irish writing and written essays on Eavan Boland, Colum McCann, Colm Tóibín, Mary Lavin, Roddy Doyle, Eimear McBride, and Éilís Ní Dhuibhne and co-edited in 2013 a collection of essays, Imagination in the Classroom, the first study of the teaching of creative writing in Ireland.  She has recently co-edited the first collection of essays on the Northern Irish novelist Deirdre Madden, Deirdre Madden: New Critical Perspectives, which is forthcoming from Manchester University Press.

JAMES ALEXANDER FRASER is currently a lecturer in English literature at National University of Ireland, Maynooth, having previously taught on James Joyce, modernism and Irish Studies at several institutions in the UK.  His published works include a monograph, James Joyce and Betrayal (2016) and an edited collection with Katherine Ebury, Outside his Jurisfiction: Joyce’s Non-Fictional Writings (2018).  He is currently at the beginning of a project on the role of bicycles in literature and art.

MAREN LINETT is professor of English at Purdue University, US, and the founding director of the Critical Disability Studies programme. She is the author of Modernism, Feminism, and Jewishness (Cambridge UP, 2007) and Bodies of Modernism: Physical Disability in Transatlantic Modernist Literature (U of Michigan P, 2017). She has edited two collections about modernist women writers and published an array of articles about modernism and disability. Her current book project is entitled Literary Bioethics: Animality, Disability, and the Human in Modern Fiction.

SANGAM MACDUFF is working on logic and modern literature at Royal Holloway, University of London, having recently completed a doctoral thesis on James Joyce’s epiphanies at the University of Geneva. He read English at Trinity Hall, Cambridge University, before completing his Masters in English Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Edinburgh. He has published on Joyce and modernism in the James Joyce Quarterly, James Joyce Broadsheet, Swiss Proceedings in English Language and Literature, Genetic Joyce Studies and European Joyce Studies.

FRITZ SENN is founder and Director of the Zürich James Joyce Foundation and Patron of the Dublin James Joyce Summer School.  He has played a key role in shaping Joyce Studies and has written widely on all aspects of Joyce's work, especially on Joyce and translation and on Joyce's use of Classical literature. His publications include, Joyce's Dislocutions, edited by John Paul Riquelme (1984), Inductive Scrutinies: Focus on Joyce, edited by Christine O'Neill (Lilliput, 1995). A volume of interviews tracing his recollections of the global Joyce community, The Joycean Murmoirs, was published in 2007, edited by Christine O'Neill.  Noch mehr über Joyce: Streiflichter, a collection of essays, appeared in 2012.

KERI WALSH is Director of the Institute of Irish Studies at Fordham University in New York and founder of Fordham’s Irish Women Writers Symposium, a recurring event that encourages scholarship on the works of Irish women writers. Walsh’s edition of Joyce’s Exiles is forthcoming from Oxford World’s Classics. She is also the editor of Dubliners (Broadview Press, 2016) and The Letters of Sylvia Beach (Columbia University Press, 2010). Her other works on Irish literature include “Catholic Church Music in Dublin” (with Callie Gallo) in James Joyce Quarterly, “Elizabeth Bowen and the Futurist Imagination” in Journal of Modern Literature and “Elizabeth Bowen, Surrealist” in Eire-Ireland. Walsh also writes about film. In 2014, her book Mickey Rourke was published in the British Film Institute’s “Film Stars” series. In 2018 she was awarded the Academy Film Scholar Fellowship by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to support the completion of Stella’s Claim: Women, Method Acting, and the Hollywood Film (forthcoming from Routledge). Her next monograph will be a history of Irish women’s playwriting.

ANNALISA VOLPONE is Associate Professor in English Literature at the University of Perugia and co-director of the CEMS (Centre for European Modernism Studies). She has extensively written on modernism and postmodernism (James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Vladimir Nabokov and John Banville); on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British literature (Mary Wollstonecraft, William Blake, S. T. Coleridge and P. B. Shelley). She is co-editor of “‘The common darkness where the dreams abide’: Perspectives on Irish Gothic and Beyond (2018). Her research interests include the interconnections between literature and science (in particular neuroscience) and posthumanism. With respect to Joyce, she is the author of the monograph Speak to us of Emailia. Per una lettura ipertestuale di “Finnegans Wake” (2003) and of a collection of essays, Joyce: Give and Take (2012). She is co-editor of the forthcoming Borders of Modernism, in which her chapter “Sound-Image-Action: Joyce and the ‘moving pictures’” appears. She is also co-editor of the forthcoming Il modernismo europeo, in which her chapter “Implosione ed esplosione del romanzo: da Ulysses a Finnegans Wake” appears. Her articles and chapters on Joyce have been published on European Joyce Studies, Italian Joyce Studies, Palgrave Series on Literature and Performance.

SEMINAR LEADERS
                     
DUBLINERS
Peter van de Kamp has published over 18 books, including a biography of Flann O’Brien (with Peter Costello), an anthology of Irish Literature in the Eighteenth Century and three anthologies of Irish literature in the Nineteenth Century, the Collected Works of James Clarence Mangan (with Jacques Chuto et al.), a collections of essays on Yeats, Dutch and Flemish poetry, translated by Irish poets, and three books of poetry.  He is working on a book on Joyce’s Dubliners.  He has taught at Leiden University and UCD and has been visiting professor at NTU.  He is currently lecturer at the Institute of Technology, Tralee.
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A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN
CHRISTINE O’NEILL studied English and German at the University of Zurich and Trinity College Dublin. Her publications include Too Fine a Point: A Stylistic Analysis of the “Eumaeus” Episode in James Joyce's “Ulysses” (1996), Inductive Scrutinies: Focus on Joyce, a collection of essays by Fritz Senn (1995), The Joycean Murmoirs of Fritz Senn (2007) and Niall Montgomery: Dublinman (2015). She has contributed to various recent international Joyce publications and has worked as a researcher, editor, translator and arts administrator in recent years.

ULYSSES
FRITZ SENN is founder and Director of the Zürich James Joyce Foundation and Patron of the Dublin James Joyce Summer School.  He has played a key role in shaping Joyce Studies and has written widely on all aspects of Joyce's work, especially on Joyce and translation and on Joyce's use of Classical literature. His publications include, Joyce's Dislocutions, edited by John Paul Riquelme (1984), Inductive Scrutinies: Focus on Joyce, edited by Christine O'Neill (Lilliput, 1995). A volume of interviews tracing his recollections of the global Joyce community, The Joycean Murmoirs, was published in 2007, edited by Christine O'Neill.  Noch mehr über Joyce: Streiflichter, a collection of essays, appeared in 2012.

FINNEGANS WAKE
TERENCE KILLEEN is Research Scholar at the James Joyce Centre, Dublin. He has written on Joyce in the James Joyce Quarterly, the James Joyce Literary Supplement and the Joyce Studies Annual. He is a frequent contributor to the online resource, jjon.org. His recent publications include an essay on the photographs of Joyce's Dublin by the Modernist photographer Lee Miller taken in 1946, which appeared in Voices on Joyce (UCD Press, 2015).  An essay on the editing of Finnegans Wake has appeared in the online journal Genetic Joyce Studies and another essay, "From Notes to Text: The Role of the Notebooks in the Composition of Finnegans Wake", has appeared in Dublin James Joyce Journal 8 (2015). "A Starchamber Quiry: Finnegans Wake and the Law" was published in Joyce and the Law, ed. Jonathan Goldman (University of Florida Press, 2017) and "A Portrait Without Perspective" appeared in the 2018 Palgrave Macmillan collection, Outside His Jurisfiction, edited by Katherine Ebury and James Fraser.  He is the author of “Ulysses” Unbound: A Reader's Companion to “Ulysses", a new edition of which was published by University of Florida Press in 2018. He has recently been elected to serve a second term as a trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation, is a member of the board of the  James Joyce Centre, and is a former journalist with The Irish Times, for which he still writes.

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The Dublin James Joyce Summer School and University College Dublin are pleased to present the 2019 programme in collaboration with the National Library of Ireland and the James Joyce Centre, Dublin.

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